Preaching in Acts and Christology

God, Christ, & The Holy Spirit
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21centpilgrim
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Preaching in Acts and Christology

Post by 21centpilgrim » Fri Nov 22, 2019 10:30 am

One of the things that added to a stronger non-trinitarian stance for me was what the preaching in the book of Acts had to say regarding Jesus.

Looking at the preaching in Acts was a valid method for Steve and many in regards to learning more of what the Bible actually teaches in regards to hell vs preconceived notions that we bring to the text, so I thought it would be a consistent helpful barometer regarding the question of a Trinitarian teaching about Christ being biblical or not.

Give it a go and share any feedback, thanks
Then those who feared the LORD spoke with each other, and the LORD listened to what they said. In his presence, a scroll of remembrance was written to record the names of those who feared him and loved to think about him.

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darinhouston
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Re: Preaching in Acts and Christology

Post by darinhouston » Tue Nov 26, 2019 9:39 pm

I've always been hesitant to draw doctrine from Acts alone, but it can be a good place to check your presuppositions -- if the teaching in Acts is consistent with your view, it's at least somewhat confirming. I don't recall anything that is inconsistent with a unitarian position from Acts, though that is almost an argument from silence. If there are places where you see positive affirmation, it might be fruitful to note a few.

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21centpilgrim
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Re: Preaching in Acts and Christology

Post by 21centpilgrim » Sun Dec 08, 2019 10:53 pm

Thanks Darin.
Acts 2 Peter's sermon at Pentecost-
22 “Fellow Israelites, listen to this: Jesus of Nazareth was a man accredited by God to you by miracles, wonders and signs, which God did among you through him, as you yourselves know. 23 This man was handed over to you by God’s deliberate plan and foreknowledge; and you, with the help of wicked men,[d] put him to death by nailing him to the cross. 24 But God raised him from the dead, freeing him from the agony of death, because it was impossible for death to keep its hold on him.

29 “Fellow Israelites, I can tell you confidently that the patriarch David died and was buried, and his tomb is here to this day. 30 But he was a prophet and knew that God had promised him on oath that he would place one of his descendants on his throne. 31 Seeing what was to come, he spoke of the resurrection of the Messiah, that he was not abandoned to the realm of the dead, nor did his body see decay. 32 God has raised this Jesus to life, and we are all witnesses of it. 33 Exalted to the right hand of God, he has received from the Father the promised Holy Spirit and has poured out what you now see and hear. 34 For David did not ascend to heaven, and yet he said,

“‘The Lord said to my Lord:
“Sit at my right hand
35
until I make your enemies
a footstool for your feet.”’[f]

36 “Therefore let all Israel be assured of this: God has made this Jesus, whom you crucified, both Lord and Messiah.”

Ok, so from this sermon, what we can glean from regarding the nature of Jesus is that he was a man. This man was a physical offspring from the lineage of David. This man, from the physical line of David was the messiah. The man Jesus was the appointee "my Lord" by the appointer "the Lord" of Psalm 110. Jesus was not always this Lord and Messiah but God made Jesus Lord and Messiah

This description of Jesus at the introductory sermon of the founding of the church, falls very short of supporting a Trinitarian understanding of Jesus. At best i think a Trinitarian could say that Peter, newly filled with the promised Holy Spirit, highlights the humanity of Christ. The 3,000 added to the church that day were impressed with a view of Jesus that in no way challenges the notion that 'the Father alone is the only God'.
Then those who feared the LORD spoke with each other, and the LORD listened to what they said. In his presence, a scroll of remembrance was written to record the names of those who feared him and loved to think about him.

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