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Easter Reflection

God, Christ, & The Holy Spirit

Easter Reflection

Postby darinhouston » Mon Mar 26, 2018 8:48 am

As we near Good Friday and Easter weekend, I was contemplating Christ’s sacrifice, and wondering: what is the “right” biblical attitude towards His sacrifice? Everything He did was for the Father’s Glory — should our focus be more on the Father’s sacrifice of His own son for our salvation or on Jesus’ sacrifice of His own life? Yes, it’s both, but we seldom consider the Father’s sacrifice, and Jesus seemed to emphasize the Father in all that He said/did.

Thoughts?
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Re: Easter Reflection

Postby Homer » Tue Mar 27, 2018 10:44 am

Hi Darin,

It seems to me that the scriptures show the disciples gathering often (Acts 2:42) and participating in "the" breaking of bread which, with the definite article τῇ would indicate a particular breaking of bread, likely what we call the eucharist or communion. Jesus focused this ritual, if we call it that, on Him, that is, "do this in remembrance of me" (1 Corinthians 11:24, Luke 22:19).

Since there is no place in scripture an annual "Easter" is enjoined, it seems best to me to consider every Sunday as "Easter". That is not to say it is wrong to have a special annual remembrance but then it might a contributing cause of the "C & E" Christians we have so many of.

Then there are others who place the focus of "remembrance" on remembering the return of Christ while there are those who see it as focused on God remembering, as the rainbow in the clouds was in the OT.

.
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Re: Easter Reflection

Postby Paidion » Tue Mar 27, 2018 11:12 pm

Good thoughts Homer!

The early Christians remembered the Lord Jesus in His death and resurrection EVERY Sunday with the celebration of the eucharist (thanksgiving) or communion. During the Sunday meeting, the singing of every hymn, the lifting of every prayer, and the utterance of every talk, was given in honour of Jesus and in thanksgiving for His loving act of sacrifice for all.

But first they participated in "The Lord's Supper," the sharing of a common meal in honour of Christ.
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Re: Easter Reflection

Postby darinhouston » Wed Mar 28, 2018 9:42 am

That’s an interesting topic, but not the one I raised exactly. Any thoughts on the original post?
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Re: Easter Reflection

Postby jarrod » Wed Mar 28, 2018 10:48 am

Darin,

I think you raise an interesting point and remind us that the sacrifice for our atonement involved both the Father and the Son. However, I doubt either would mind sharing their glory if our rememberance focused on one aspect of the plan, promise, and fulfilling work involved in that atonement. This made me think of John 17

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Re: Easter Reflection

Postby mattrose » Wed Mar 28, 2018 10:19 pm

darinhouston wrote:As we near Good Friday and Easter weekend, I was contemplating Christ’s sacrifice, and wondering: what is the “right” biblical attitude towards His sacrifice? Everything He did was for the Father’s Glory — should our focus be more on the Father’s sacrifice of His own son for our salvation or on Jesus’ sacrifice of His own life? Yes, it’s both, but we seldom consider the Father’s sacrifice, and Jesus seemed to emphasize the Father in all that He said/did.

Thoughts?


It seems to me that some of our most popular atonement theories actually militate against considering the Father's sacrifice. In the worst variations of Anselm's satisfaction theory and penal substitution theories, the Father is more the one that sacrifice is being made to than one making a sacrifice.
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Re: Easter Reflection

Postby Paidion » Thu Mar 29, 2018 7:44 pm

Right on, Matt!

Although God dwells in the praises of His people, I don't think the Father and the Son are primarily seeking glory for themselves. They are the most unselfish, giving, Beings in the Universe! Their primary interest is the provision of deliverance from wrongdoing (made possible through the sacrificial death and resurrection of God's Son). For God knows that as insofar as we are being saved (delivered) from sin, we will be living the best life possible. As I see it, salvation is a life-long process.

I know that the book of Ephesians declares that "You have been saved."(Eph 2:5,8). Strangely, these two verses are the ONLY verses in the New Testament where it is said that we have been saved, whereas "being saved" occurs 5 times (3 of them in Pauline epistles), and "will be saved" 14 times (6 of them in Pauline epistles). For this reason one of my Greek teachers thought that Paul wasn't the author of Ephesians.

Though I don't agree that Paul wasn't the author of Ephesians, it was an interesting observation that nowhere else does "have been saved" occur.
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Re: Easter Reflection

Postby Homer » Sun Apr 01, 2018 11:42 pm

Hi Paidion,

You wrote:

I know that the book of Ephesians declares that "You have been saved."(Eph 2:5,8). Strangely, these two verses are the ONLY verses in the New Testament where it is said that we have been saved, whereas "being saved" occurs 5 times (3 of them in Pauline epistles), and "will be saved" 14 times (6 of them in Pauline epistles). For this reason one of my Greek teachers thought that Paul wasn't the author of Ephesians.

Though I don't agree that Paul wasn't the author of Ephesians, it was an interesting observation that nowhere else does "have been saved" occur


It seems to me that Paul wrote the same idea in different words in Romans 8:1:

Romans 8:1 (NASB)
1. Therefore there is now no condemnation for those who are in Christ Jesus.


Wouldn't the state of not being condemned be the same as being saved? It is even clearer in the NKJV that has the following:

Romans 8:1 (NKJV)
1. There is therefore now no condemnation to those who are in Christ Jesus, who do not walk according to the flesh, but according to the Spirit.

The italicized part is not in the manuscript used by the NASB, but makes it clear that those (present tense) who are walking according to the Spirit are not condemned and thus are "saved". I agree this faithfulness is necessary to remain saved.
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